Grade 310

 

310 Products Features

310 grade stainless steel is available in our stocks from 0,60mm upto 50mm. This grade has oxidation resistance under typical fire upto 1250°C. It has good friction capability upto 800°C. It is used in chemical, and petro-chemical industries, heat exchangers, and heating gas tubes.

310 Products Features

 

(Note: This grade remains non-magnetic even after cold working.) Birimler
Density 7,9x10³kg/m³
Elastic Modulus 200GPa
Poisson Oranı 0,30
Poisson’s Ratio 500J/kg K
Thermal Conductivity: 100°C’de 14,2W/mK
500°C’de 18,5W/mK
Electrical Resistivity 780n m
Mean Co-efficient of
Thermal Expansion: 0 – 100°C 15,9µm/mK
0 – 315°C 16,2µm/mK
0 – 540°C 17,0µm/mK
0 – 700°C 17,8µm/mK
0 – 1000°C 18,9µm/mK
Melting Range 1400 – 1450°C
Relative Permeability 1,02
(Note: This grade remains non-magnetic even after cold working.)
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

(According to ASTM A240/A167 )

Tensile Strength 515 MPa min
Proof Strength (0,2% strain ) 205 MPamin
Elongation (% on 50 mm) %40 min
Hardness ( Brinell) 217 max
PROPERTIES AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES
Short High Typical Typical Voltage Strength. The following features are for the 310S watered.

These values are given for guidance purposes and should not be used for design purposes..

Temperature°C 500 600 700 800 925 1040
Tensile Strength (MPa) 480 425 315 205 117 76
0,2 Proof Strength (MPa) 180 156 130 105
Elongation (% on 50mm) 35 38 31 49 56
REPRESENTATIVE CREEP AND RUPTURE PROPERTIES

Stress to produce 1% strain:

Temperature °C 10 000 Hours 100 000 Hours
480 157 MPa 103 Mpa
540 121 Mpa 81 Mpa
595 88 Mpa 61 Mpa
650 58 Mpa 41 Mpa
705 34 Mpa 25 Mpa
760 17 Mpa 14 Mpa
815 9 Mpa 6 Mpa
Stress to produce rupture:
Temperature °C 10 000 Hours 100 000 Hours
540 259 MPa 223 Mpa
595 163 Mpa 138 Mpa
650 92 Mpa 76 Mpa
705 60 Mpa 48 Mpa
760 41 Mpa 31 Mpa
815 31 Mpa 23 Mpa

MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED SERVICE TEMPERATURE (IN OXIDISING CONDITIONS)

Continuous            1 150°C
Intermittent            1 040°C
CORROSION RESISTANCE
Because of the many possible variations involved-temperature, corrosive environment, alloy composition, time, operating practice, etc. – it is difficuld to discuss in detail every combination. Thus, the following data should only be used as a guideline.
OXIDATION
In many processes, isothermal (constant temperature) conditions are not maintained and process temperatures vary. Expansion differences between the base metal and the scale during heating and cooling can cause cracking and spalling of the protective scale. This allows the oxidising media to attack the exposed metal surface.
The spalling resistance is greatly improved with the higher nickel contents such as is found in 310. Nickel reduces the expansion differential between the scale and the base metal.
EFFECT OF ATMOSPHERE
An increase in corrosion rate can be expected in the presence of water vapour for the traditional 18/8 type stainless steels. The increased nickel and chrome contents of the 309 and 310 types provides good resistance to moist air at temperatures in excess of 980 °C. 310 also has good scaling resistance to carbon dioxide and can be used at temperatures similar to those quoted for service in air.
SULPHUR VAPOUR

Sulphur vapour readily attacks the austenitic grades. Typical corrosion rates for various stainless steels after 1 300 hours exposure to flowing sulphur vapour at 570 C are given below.

Tip
Korz.Oranı (mpy)
310
18,9
309
22,3
304
27,0
316
27,0
321
54,8
10 has been used successfully in a sulphur vapour line at a temperature of 480 °C
FLUE GASES
It is extremely difficult to generalise corrosion rates in flue and process gases since gas composition and temperature may vary considerably within the same process unit. Combustion gases normally contain sulphur compounds:
Sulphur dioxide is present as an oxidising gas alongwith carbon dioxide, nitrogen, carbon monoxide and excess oxygen. Protective oxides are generally formed and depending on exact conditions, the corrosion rate may be similar ar slightly greater than for service in air.
Reducing flue gases contain varying amounts of hydrogen sulphide, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. The corrosion rates encountered in these environments are sensitive to hydrogen sulphide content and temperature and satisfactory material selection often necessitates service testing. The high nickel content of 310 may be deleterious in some instances and 309 may be the preferred material.
CARBURISATION
High chromium and nickel contents result in a slower diffusion rate of carbon into the steel.310 has therefore good resistance to carburizing atmospheres..
AMMONIA AND NITROGEN
The high nickel content of 310 ensures a good resistance to ammonia atmospheres at high temperatures. Typical corrosion rates for 310 in an ammonia convertor containing 5-6% NH3 after 30 000 hours at 500 °C are in the region of 0,1 mpy.
HOT WORKING
310 can be forged, hot headed and upset satisfactorily. Initial forging temperatures should be between 1 150 and 1 200 °C. Finishing temperatures should be above 950 C. Small forgings should be cooled rapidly in air or water.If precipitation of carbides will be harmful in corrosive environments, 310S is recommended..
ANNEALING
Head from 1030 or 1150 °C and water quench. Soaking times are 1,5 hours per 25mm of section. Annealing will ensure that any carbide precipitates are taken back into solution.
COLD WORKING
310 can be deep drawn, stamped, headed and upset without difficulty. 310 does work harden and severe forming operations should be followed by annealing.
WELDING
310 can besatisfactorily welded and brazed by all methods. If carbide precipitation will be a problem in corrosive environments, 310S is recommended unless the welded assembly can be heated to 1030 °C and water quenched.
Welding procedures for 310 will have to be selected with care in order to avoid hot cracking due to the fully austenitic weld micro-structure abtained from using matching